Music Consumption in the MP3 Era
Music Consumption in the MP3 Era

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Name: uao
Location: California

uao is also a contributor to Blogcritics.org, Rhapsody Radish. and FIQL.com.

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A Sampling of Articles, Reviews, and Essays:

Feel free to dig through the Deep Freeze for more, but stuff dated before mid-March 2005 is still formative and impressionistic, and not really worth the effort.

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I grew up reading Robert Christgau, Village Voice, and Lester Bangs, Creem, Punk, various others.

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Note: the copyrighted audio material on this site is for listening only, and is not downloadable. It is provided as illustrations to the articles, and to interest people in the legal purchase of these artists' material. Any copyright holder who would like their material removed should contact me, and I'll remove it.

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Monday, March 28, 2005
 

Perfect Circle

Camper Van Beethoven: Telephone Free Landslide Victory (1985)   R.E.M.: Reckoning (1984)
Let's Active: Big Plans for Everyone (1986)   The dB's: Stands For Decibles (1981)


Jangle Pop was an American post-punk movement of the mid-'80s that marked a return to the chiming guitars and pop melodies of the '60s.

Jangle Pop was a short-lived but very welcome genre of mid-80's rock; a roots-rock subgenre, it was a reinvention of the 60's folk rock sound crossed with 80's pop sensibilities, often with a punky, brisk tempo. R.E.M., early in their career, could be considered the standard-bearer of jangle-pop, which emphasized ringing guitars and vocal harmonies.

It was not the most popular music of its day; R.E.M.'s albums of the time never charted better than the lower reaches of the top-30, and many of the other groups of the time are already largely forgotten, among them the Bangles, the dB's, Pylon, Let's Active, The Plimsouls, and Guadalcanal Diary.

These bands often sounded very do-it-yourself in their approach, and their records had an appealing rawness to them that recalled some 60's garage bands. In the southeast, bands like R.E.M. and Let's Active had a southern, slightly country flavor to them, while the West Coast bands were more psychedelic. Heartland bands tended to lean towards cowpunk. The earliest ones had some wisps of punky residue; by the mid-80's a gentler, less angular sound was in favor.

The Bangles: The Bangles [EP] (1983)   Dream Syndicate: days Of Wine And Roses (1982)   Guadalcanal Diary: 2X4 (1987)   The Bongos: Numbers With WIngs [EP] (1983)


Most of the jangle pop bands' lyrics were enigmatic and impressionistic; some were specialists in a kind of double-irony.

A common touchstone from the 70's is the music of Big Star and its leader, Alex Chilton. Game Theory resembled a punchier Big Star, and the Replacements even named a song for Chilton.

Jangle Pop's heyday was from the emergence of R.E.M. in 1983 through the late 80's. It's virtually extinct now, except for a handful of niche artists. R.E.M.'s greatest successes came after they moved to Warner Brothers, and moved away from the genre they had a huge hand in creating. Most of the other bands didn't survive into the 90's.

Jangle Pop's demise was due to limitations in its very structure; a lot of the bands, particularly the lesser known ones, suffered from material that often sounded too similar. It passed for alternative rock in the middle of the decade, but by the turn of the 90's, tastes had turned towards heavier music again.

Tonight, Freeway Jam looks back fondly at those bands. Any R.E.M. fan would enjoy this music, as would fans of the early Bangles, or even the Replacements. If you're not a fan of any of those bands, it's unlikely this is for you.

But for the rest of us, I've set my Media Center to randomize all titles in my library tagged as "jangle pop", a pool of 321 songs. First ten titles randomly selected by Media Center are profiled, Jam tags, 1-5 stars, follow:

1. Game Theory: Last Day That We're Young *****
Game Theory: Lolita Nation (1987)
Game Theory, from Sacramento, existed on the fringes of the psychedelic paisley underground movement, playing the same venues as Dream Syndicate and Thin White Rope. Lead singer Scott Miller is almost a dead ringer vocally for Alex Chilton, and there's something of Big Star in their instrumental approach. Lolita Nation was an ambitious double album, dark and moody, but full of aggressive, melodic playing, and cryptic pop-culture references. Most of titles on the album are short fragments, but this one is 5 minutes and keeps an edgy intensity thoughout.

2. The Long Ryders: Ivory Tower *****
The Long Ryders: Native Sons (1984)
This sounds a lot like the Byrds at the outset with its ringing guitar intro, and singer Sid Griffin sounding like a cross between Roger McGuinn and Gram Parsons. Which is particularly nifty, because real-life Byrd Gene Clark guests on harmony vocal. Excellent, literate lyrics, written by by bassist Barry Shank, who left the band prior to its debut. From Native Sons, the best folk-rock album of the 80's and one of the best of any era.

3. Rain Parade: No Easy Way Down (live) ****
Rain Parade: Perfume River (2002)
Hypnotic, updated raga-rock recorded live in 1985, at the peak of the post-David Roback period. This is convincing stuff, well sung and well played (if a little too faithful to the studio version). While Rain Parade's early work can be considered jangle pop like the work of the other paisley underground bands, this particular track is too reverb-laden and consciously psychedelic to really qualify. But it's a great tune, David Roback gets a partial songwriting credit on it.

4. R.E.M.: Perfect Circle *****
R.E.M. Murmer (1983)
Delicate gem from R.E.M.'s debut album, centered around two overdubbed pianos played by Mike Mills (one a deliberately out-of-tune upright, one an in-tune grand) and a shimmering, swirling guitar from Peter Buck. The lyrics are among the most indecipherable of the band's career (cynics at the time called Murmer "Mumble"), but they're beautifully sung by a wistful Stipe. All of Murmer is indispensible; this is one of the key cuts.

5. The Feelies: Fa Cé La *****
The Feelies: Crazy Rhythms (1980)
The Feelies' debut precedes the emergence of jangle pop by a good 4 years or so, but it cast a long shadow over the jangle pop scene. Crazy Rhythms, released in 1980, has often been cited by R.E.M. as a major influence on their sound, as have other bands of the era. Certainly, "Fa Cé La", the Feelies' first single, sounds a lot like jangle pop, with its close harmonies and fuzzy guitar and jumpy, edgy rhythm. The Feelies lasted right through to 1991, but never quite managed to gain sales to match their reputation. R.E.M.'s Peter Buck co-produced their 1986 disk The Good Earth, a belated follow-up to their debut.

6. Camper Van Beethoven: The History Of Utah ****
Camper Van Beethoven: Camper Van Beethoven (1986)
In their own words, Camper Van Beethoven, from Santa Cruz, created 'surrealist absurdist folk'. They definately specialized in alienation anthems; this one quotes Neil Young's "The Loner" on violin. This is from their 1986 third album, and it can be argued that this is a little too progressive to fit the jangle pop bill, but their stoner folk leanings, slacker outlook, and overall roots rock melodicism puts them at the fringe. Camper Van Beethoven's last album proper was released in 1989, but they reunited in 2004 and released a new album, New Roman Times.

7. The Replacements: Alex Chilton ****
The Replacements: Pleased To Meet Me (1987)
From Pleased To Meet Me, the first Replacements album after the firing of guitarist Bob Stinson, this is an ode to Paul Westerberg's hero Alex Chilton, founder of the doomed proto-jangle pop 70's band Big Star: I never travel far/Without a little Big Star The Replacements are another band that don't wear the jangle pop label well, although they did share much in common (including influences) with the other bands. Their music was harder, more muscular, better played than many of the more twee bands of the era; while the previous two albums (with Stinson) were more satisfying, Pleased To Meet Me was pretty good too, benefiting from ambitious arrangements.

8. Let's Active: Every Word Means No *****
Let's Active: Afoot (1983)
Led by Mitch Easter, better known as R.E.M.'s producer, Let's Active specialized in a punky jangle pop with southern overtones. From their 1981 debut EP, Afoot, "Every Word Means No" has a strong garage rock vibe, ringing, chiming guitars, and breezy harmonies between Easter and bandmate Faye Hunter. This has an almost British Invasion feel to it, and a jittery rhythm. The band's lineup would change frequently, and essentially became a vehicle for Easter, but the material released under their name is worth investigating.

9. The Plimsouls: Oldest Story In The World ****
The Plimsouls: Everywhere At Once (1983)
Leader Peter Case had been around for a while when he formed the Plimsouls, having released records as part of The Nerves, an L.A. power-pop band of the late 70's. The Plimsouls aren't really jangle-pop, but "Oldest Story In The World" almost qualifies as a folk song about Hollywood, if such a thing is possible. It features a minor-key melody and harmonica, as well as the requisite jangly guitar. Included for the same reason the Feelies are; their influence was felt wide among the jangle pop bands.

10. Guadalcanal Diary: Watusi Rodeo ****
Guadalcanal Diary:  Walking in the Shadow of the Big Man (1984)
Marietta, GA was home to Guadalcanal Diary, not too far from Athens, when R.E.M. and other bands were just beginning to gain notice beyond the region. The band, while bearing many of the same hallmarks of the Athens bands, pursued a dark, moody, aggressive sound with clanging guitars and forceful drumming. "Watusi Rodeo" falls somewhere between jangle-pop and cowpunk. Originally released as the keystone of a 1983 EP for Athens-based DB Records, it was also included on their 1984 major-label debut for Elektra, Walking in the Shadow of the Big Man.
 
 

Lime In The Coconut and the Coca Cola Ad

Just a quickie note on Harry Nilsson, the composer and singer you hear in the recent Coca Cola ad campaign.

Harry Nilsson: Coconut (1972)


For those who are unfamiliar with 2-time Grammy winner Nilsson, he was a true original and maverick. He was a hitmaker in the early 70's, popularizing songs by excellent under-appreciated songwriters; "Everybody's Talking" (Fred Neil) "Without You" (Pete Ham/Tom Evans), an entire album of Randy Newman songs. He was also an excellent singer/songwriter in his own right; a master of sardonic humor crafted to exquisitely intricate arrangements, borrowing ideas as far back as the 1920's, and singing them in what had once been an astonishingly sweet, expressive voice that hinted obliquely at a dark side. Originals like "I Guess The Lord Must Be In New York City", "Me And My Arrow", "Spaceman", "Jump Into The Fire", and "Daybreak" all made the top-40, and were among the most adventurous songs you'd hear on AM radio. He recorded a concept album suitable for children, The Point. His own composition "One" was a top-10 hit for Three Dog Night. His "You're Breaking My Heart" ('so fuck you!') is the stuff of legend. Nilsson also wrote and sang the theme song to the TV series, The Courtship of Eddie's Father.

He first caught the attention of the Beatles in 1968 with an ingenious medley of interwoven fragments of Beatles songs, and was John Lennon's drinking buddy during Lennon's famed "lost weekend" period, when they gained notoriety for getting bombed and obnoxious around L.A. Together, they recorded a drunken, ravaged-sounding Nilsson album Pussy Cats, a cult item that careens from moments of pure genius to utter bathos and back again. He never really recovered from those days, but cut some other interesting music for his cult, including an album of pre-rock standards. He stopped recording in 1979, for the most part, after his RCA contract ran out, and ultimately died from a heart attack in 1994.

Harry Nilsson: Nilsson Sings Newman (1970)   Harry Nilsson: The Point (1970)   Harry Nilsson: Nilsson Schmilsson (1971)   Harry Nilsson: Pussy Cats (1974)


Quite possibly his greatest original hit, a moment of pure, crackpot genius, was his 1972 top-10 hit "Coconut":

Brother bought a coconut, he bought it for a dime
His sister had another one, she paid it for the lime
She put de lime in de coconut, drink 'em bot' togeder
she put de lime in de coconut, drink 'em bot' up.
She put de lime in de coconut, drink 'em bot' togeder
put de lime in de coconut, call de doctor woke him up, an' say

Doctor! Ain't der notin I can take, I say
Doctor! to relieve dis belly ache, I say
Doctor! ain't der notin I can take, I say
Doctor! To relieve my belly ache?

I put de lime in de coconut, drink 'em bot togeder,
put de lime in de coconut, I drink 'em bot' down,
I put de lime in de coconut, drink 'em bot' togeder,
put de lime in de coco nut, call de Doctor, woke him up an' say...



In the ad, Coca Cola uses the original recording:

Put de lime in de coconut, drink 'em bot' togeder

and superimpose the following lyrics as captions:

Put the lime in the Coke, you nut, and drink them both together